Catholics in WWII

...anding.”[5] This highlights the importance that servicemen placed on religion and highlights the old saying that there are no atheists in the foxholes. Louis Meyer Photograph, Assasm India, 1844 The other major part of Dougherty’s WWII correspondence deals with chaplains, both from an administrative national level and an individual priest

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Mary Brackett Willcox and Catholicism in the Suburbs

...would grow out of its various mission churches.[11] Her manuscript collection contains important correspondence with leading Catholic figures of the 19th century, such as Father Edward Sourin and Father Patrick Moriarty.[12] Letters she received from various priests also give insight into the growth and struggles of the Catholic Church. One

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Recently Processed Collection: John Gilmary Shea Correspondence

...ures who helped Shea during his scholarly years. For instance, the collection contains a large file of correspondence between Oscar Wilkes Collet, a writer, scholar, and member of the Missouri Historical Society. Here is a postcard received by Shea requesting help locating research materials. February 2, 1885 postcard sent by

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World War One Army Chaplains

...igned to the 110th Infantry Regiment in the 55th Brigade of the 28th Division and crossed the Atlantic to join the fighting in France.[5]   Wolfe’s letters back to the states were often published in the Catholic Standard and Times, which gives us great insight into the conditions that faced

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